Francesco Urbano Ragazzi

Tomaso De Luca and the Sculpture of Trauma.

MAXXI BVLGARI PRIZE 2020.
Published by Cura.

Essay by Francesco Urbano Ragazzi included in the catalogue.
Other texts by Giovanna Melandri, Jean-Christophe Babin, Bartolomeo Pietromarchi, Manuel Borja-Villel, Emma Lavigne, Dominic van den Boogerd, Marianna Vecellio, Giulia Ferracci.

CURA.BOOKS. II MAXXI BVLGARI PRIZE

The publication, commissioned by MAXXI – National Museum of 21st Century Arts and published by CURA.BOOKS in conjunction with the exhibition presents the three finalists of the MAXXI BVLGARI PRIZE 2020: Giulia Cenci, Tomaso De Luca, and Renato Leotta. Introduced by Giovanna Melandri’s (Fondazione MAXXI, President) and Jean-Christophe Babin’s (CEO of the BVLGARI Group) texts, the book includes essays by Bartolomeo Pietromarchi (MAXXI Arte, Director), Manuel Borja-Villel (Director of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía), and Emma Lavigne (President of the Palais de Tokyo), which highlight the visionary force and value of the three artists’ gaze in today’s world.

Tomaso De Luca, winner of II MAXXI BVLGARI PRIZE, is presented by Francesco Urbano Ragazzi who emphasizes the dialogue between his films, installations and sculptures and the idea of trauma: «A Week’s Notice is also a personal monument in which, among others, the artist’s biography flows: Milan, Rome, New York, San Francisco, Berlin. The attics, the cellars, the bedrooms and the studios, the never quite finished house moves, the cardboard walls, the exhibitions and the incessant work of redesigning the world while everything seems temporary. While the class consciousness flows into unconsciousness, masking the servant as an entrepreneur, the worker as a manager, the user as a salesman. And all this is certainly frightening, but also very funny: like looking at the world from a privileged observatory to imagine new situations and new rules. The work of art is the playing field, at once small and immense, in which the characters can stop interpreting themselves indefinitely: in which Harlequin can use a slapstick as a fan, in which Tom can enter a hole in the wall with Jerry, in which Laurel and Hardy can finally hug.»